Got CALICHE? http://www.swanet.org/caliche.html

MEXICO

http://www.dallasobserver.com:80/issues/current/feature2.html Hristov is obsessed with a tiny Roman terra-cotta head. He believes the head provides evidence that Europeans landed in what is now Mexico long before Spanish conquistador Hernán de Cortés weighed anchor at Veracruz in 1519. Hristov has spent more than a decade chasing down this head and the dozen other items recovered from pre-Columbian archaeological sites that may prove such contacts. "He's swimming upstream," says a dubious David J. Meltzer, professor of anthropology at SMU.

ARIZONA

http://www.the-observer.com/ On August 11, 1680, the Hopis rebelled under the leadership of Pope,' a medicine man from one of the Rio Grande Pueblos. In a few days more than 400 Spaniards lay dead, scores of ranches and churches were burned to the ground.

NEW MEXICO

http://www.latimes.com:80/HOME/NEWS/FOOD/t000075623.html A chapter on the Zuni language starts the book (the title word, Idonapshe, means "let's eat"). And photographs show the Zuni Pueblo in western New Mexico, bread baking in the beehive oven and other scenes of Zuni life. It ends with a detailed nutritional analysis of the recipes, in keeping with the goal of improving the Zuni diet. Information on Zuni culture is woven into the recipes as well as being supplied in separate passages, making this a good reference work for students of native Americans and the Southwest. "Idonapshe: Let's Eat" can be ordered from the University of New Mexico Press (800) 249-7737.

CYBERIA

http://www2.nando.net:80/noframes/story/0,2107,85943-135724-946929-0,00.html The prehistoric man found in a Canadian glacier is intriguing, but his remains may not be old enough to help resolve the intensifying debate over how people arrived in North America. The body is in cold storage in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory.

http://www.abcnews.go.com/sections/science/DailyNews/mummies990825.html Howard Carter and his team emptied the chamber of King Tut’s mummy. Seven years later, 11 people associated with the project were dead. Newspapers and locals at the time attributed the sinister occurrences to the notorious curse of the mummy. Emily Teeter offers another explanation. A bunch of old geezers worked on the tomb. Most succumbed to old age. But Gotthard Kramer believes there may be truth in mummy curses. He analyzed 40 mummies and identified several mold spores on each one. These spores can lead to organ failure and even death, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/sci/tech/newsid_321000/321181.stm This new baby mummy will now be subjected to carbon dating and DNA tests. These will establish many more details about its brief life and pin down a more precise age for the remains. Current estimates suggest the mummy is between 1,500 and 2,000 years old. Carlos Aschero said he wanted to know more about the diet of the early inhabitants of the north of Argentina. Analysis of the mummy should help reveal such secrets.

http://www.sltrib.com:80/1999/aug/08261999/nation_w/18361.htm The Americans came to Brazil at the urging of Emperor Dom Pedro II, who longed to see them bring their cotton-planting expertise to his sprawling land. By the late 1860s, several thousand Southerners were heading for Brazil. The celebrators, whose ancestors abandoned the American South for Brazil after the Civil War, worry a lot about their heritage these days. They worry about being shunned by other Brazilians, for whom the American Confederacy represents racism, slavery and unwelcome controversy.

http://www.news-observer.com/daily/1999/08/26/nc05.html So many shipwrecks, so little help. That's the quandary facing the state Underwater Archaeology Unit, which will rely on East Carolina University graduate students to help examine the latest find, a Confederate gunboat probably sunk in the Pasquotank River after a battle with Union vessels. The wreck is believed to be the CSS Black Warrior, a gunboat running with the Mosquito Fleet a few days after the battle at Roanoke Island in 1862.

http://cjonline.com/stories/082699/kan_histsoc.shtml Kansas State Historical Society staff told legislators Wednesday they want to spend $13.7 million over five years on capital improvements.

http://www.jsonline.com/news/wauk/aug99/museum26082599a.asp After months of negotiations, the county has extended an offer to the Waukesha County Historical Society to take over management of the Waukesha County Museum, County Executive Daniel Finley said Wednesday. "When you have county resources that inevitably end up going to jails and human service programs, it's very difficult to find the support and even, candidly, the enthusiasm for the museum," Finley said. "Government is just never going to do as good a job as the private enthusiasts will. Therefore, I'd love to see the Historical Society take control of the facility."

http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/local/hist26.shtml The group identified historical buildings, then worked to make them fit with Seattle's future. It saves buildings that others might not be able to.

http://www.the-times.co.uk/news/pages/tim/99/08/26/timcrtcrt01003.html?999 The European Association of Archaeologists' fifth annual meeting will discuss the management of Europe's cultural heritage and the fragile surviving archaeological record. As tourism expands and tourists want to see the remains of the past in the countries they visit, archaeology is becoming big business. An entire session of the conference will consider ways of interpretation, ranging from excavation open days to heritage theme parks, to try discover whether people interested in the past are a single constituency or a mosaic of different interest groups.