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CALIFORNIA

http://www.latimes.com:80/excite/990822/t000074973.html Like many Native Americans in California, Basquez ducked the 1990 U.S. census. The state's history of missions and the Gold Rush resulted in Native Americans losing land and being split and regrouped into new reservations. That led to confusion over tribal names.

ARIZONA

http://www.azstarnet.com/public/dnews/0822R3.html A Hohokam ruin, popularized as a place where the ancients viewed the moon and stars, endured more than 800 years in the desert near Tucson and even survived a rancher's bulldozer more than a decade ago. But the ruin may not survive New Age ceremonialism "run amok." The state Land Department will invite representatives of four tribes to visit the site, help assess the damage and recommend what to do to prevent more harm. The Land Department's staff of two archaeologists and two trespass agents are stretched thin over 9.2 million acres. So the option at Zodiac Ridge may include increasing the monitoring of the site through volunteer stewards or sheriff's deputies.

http://www.azcentral.com:80/community/comstories/0822adobe.shtml Elias started building the vernacular adobe room by room in 1882 or 1883 and finished in 1885, according to family records. The Elias-Rodriguez House is one of the clearest examples of Sonoran architecture the Valley has to offer. History can be traced in adobe. Arizona communities, including Tucson, Tombstone, Florence, Wickenburg and Yuma, still boast many adobe structures. But around the Valley, the bulk of adobes has been either knocked down or covered up, according to state historic Preservation Officer Jim Garrison. The state preservation office lists 253 sites on its list of adobe homes in Maricopa County. These homes range in age from the 1870s to the 1930s and up.

http://www.washingtonpost.com:80/wp-srv/WPlate/1999-08/22/109l-082299-idx.html According to the National Park Service, "resource violations" have increased 123 percent in the past five years. At Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona, for instance, rangers believe visitors make off with more than 12 tons of petrified wood a year. To make sure they're able to catch people who are taking relics from parklands, rangers are being trained to recognize relic hunters. This week, several national and local experts in archaeology will instruct park rangers in how to spot and stop relic hunting.

UTAH

http://www.bergen.com:80/travel/fromm0822199908223.htm Based in the tiny southeast Utah town of Monticello, the school aims not only to educate the public -- "using the Colorado plateau as an outdoor classroom," they say -- but on some trips also to let them participate in original research.

NEW MEXICO

http://www.econet.apc.org:80/igc/en/aa/99081918293/aa5.html Cattle ranchers are resorting to the rhetoric of hate groups to stifle grazing reform in New Mexico. One of the ads, which appeared in The New Mexico Stockman Magazine (July 1999) reads: "ETHNIC CLEANSING...CULTURAL GENOCIDE...SERBS...YOU DON'T HAVE TO GO OVERSEAS TO FIND THEM. THEY ARE RIGHT HERE IN OUR NATIONAL FORESTS, IN OUR RURAL COMMUNITIES, IN OUR MEDIA OUTLETS. SERBS (SELFISH ENVIRONMENTAL RADICAL BIGOTS) ARE DEMONIZING LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS THROUGH THE COURTS AND THE MEDIA. THEIR GOAL -- AND THEY ARE DOING A PRETTY GOOD JOB OF IT SO FAR -- IS TO REMOVE LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS FROM THE LAND...TO DESTROY RURAL ECONOMIES AND FAMILIES...TO DESTROY THE CUSTOM AND CULTURE...TO ERASE THE TRADITIONAL ETHNIC BACKGROUNDS OF NEW MEXICO AND THE SOUTHWEST..."

TEXAS

http://www.herald.com:80/content/tue/living/travel/digdocs/021742.htm The daily cattle drive is the city's newest attraction, meant to evoke century-old images of life on the dusty trail. Merrell said it's the job of six drovers to ensure that the longhorns stay together -- and off the sidewalks -- as they pass through the tourist district that features Spanish-style buildings and rows of storefronts. The herd will travel along the approximate route of the Chisholm Trail to grassland along the Trinity River. The city-operated program is believed to be the first of its kind. Tom Saunders, historian for the Fort Worth Herd, says the longhorns are symbolic of the survival spirit of early Texans.

CYBERIA

http://www.cnn.com/TECH/computing/9908/20/comp.museum.ap/index.html The Computer Museum of America offers trip down technology lane.

http://www.sltrib.com:80/1999/aug/08221999/nation_w/17238.htm Pottery underfoot is telling a fascinating new story. Based on the shards, Bauer is piecing together a new picture of the rise of Inca civilization. Bauer believes that most of the valley's archeological sites will disappear within the next decade.

http://www.sunday-times.co.uk/news/pages/Sunday-Times/stifgnusa02003.html?999 The first people to inhabit America were Australian Aborigines - not American Indians.

http://www.duluthnews.com/today/dnt/local/finn.htm Driven by a passion for anthropology and history, Lynn Laitala is convinced there's an audience hungry to consume the information she presents in New World Finn, an upstart tabloid newspaper that made its debut last month.