Message #178:
From: AzTeC SW Archaeology SIG
To:   "'Matthias Giessler'" 
Subject: Electronic AAS Petroglyph May 1997
Date: Fri, 09 May 1997 15:56:54 -0700


[ The printed version of the Arizona Archaeological Society Petroglyph, May
1997, was distributed to the paid membership.  The Editors of the
Petroglyph, Linda Trujillo and Vicki Erhart, want you to see what the AAS
is accomplishing!  The AAS offers dozens of volunteer and educational
opportunities for the avocational archaeologist.  You are most welcomed to
join the AAS and become a member of the chapter closest to you! Please
re-distribute this information as widely as possible -- SASIG Ed. ]


From: Linda Trujillo Linda_Trujillo-P26182@email.mot.com

Chapter News

Agave House Chapter
HEBER / OVERGAARD -- For information, contact Tom Clay at 520/535-3066.

Casa Malpais Chapter
SPRINGERVILLE -- Chapter meetings are held every other month.  For
information, please contact Linda Martin at 520/333-5271. 

Cochise Chapter
Our April 3 meeting featured John Madsen of Tucson's Arizona State Museum
in an informative slide presentation about "Hohokam Agriculture."
Especially interesting were his samples of clothing, footwear, and rope
made with yucca fiber. The May 1 meeting will be devoted to planning for
summer events, the
picnic, and the Field School.  If you are going to be in Sierra Vista on
the first Thursday of the Month, we would love to have you join us at our
7:00 pm meetings in the Mona Bishop Room at the Public Library.  The dates
are May 1, September 4, October 2, November 6, and December 4.  Meetings
are NOT planned for June, July or August. 

John Murray and Carl Krueger say that the collection of Garden Canyon
artifacts will not be moved back to the new laboratory this month.
Construction is taking longer than planned and there is no firm date for
the move. Regardless, they are looking for help to make the move, so please
make sure Carl has your name and number if you plan to help.  His number is
520/458-0892. 

The chapter's Pancake Breakfast Fund Raiser was held at the Landmark on
Saturday, April 12.  We realized donations amounting to $184, which will
help us keep our dues at their present level. 

The Cochise Chapter Annual Picnic will begin at noon on Saturday, May 17,
at the LOWER Picnic Ground in Garden Canyon.  The LOWER area was chosen
because more parking is available.  As usual, the "excavators and
screeners" will be busy from 8:00 am until noon.  Members of any AAS
chapter are welcome to this fun-filled, pot-luck event, including the
morning excavation session.  Our unique "Jay Bird Necklace" T shirts will
be on sale, if there are any left. 

AAS Certification Classes in Field Crew I and Field Crew II will be offered
at the Garden Canyon Site during the weeks of June 2 and June 9.  Call Les
Chapman at 520/378-0826 or Donn Ivey at 520/458-5563 for an application. --
Les Chapman

Coronado Chapter
On April 4, we were privileged to see slides and hear a narrative report by
Peter Pilles, archaeologist for the Coconino National Forest, on the "Hopi
Clan Migration Traditions and Archaeology." 

Our Archaeology Awareness Month Day was a success!  We were pleased with
the cooperation of the society members and the public response. The
following projects are progressing but volunteers are needed:

1.  Owens Site Analysis.
2.  Gridded Gardens.  Dr. Neeley will be here again in May with students.
Dr. Doolittle will return in August during monsoon season to work.
3.  McEuen Cave Excavation.  Bruce Huckell of the Maxwell Museum at the
University of Mexico, and Steve Shackley of the Phoebe Hearst Museum at the
University of California Berkley, will be working at the cave.  So far,
this is all volunteer work.  No grants have been approved.
4.  Little Jennye Project.
5.  Old Lady Gay Cabin Stabilization.

Our May 9 meeting at 7:30 pm at the BLM building conference room will have
Gayl Harrison Hartman and William Hartman presenting the program "Coronado
Slept Here:  New Discoveries About Coronado's Army Route Throughout the
Southwest." In the fall our meeting time and date will change to the first
Friday of each month at 7:00 pm at the BLM building conference room.  For
more information, please contact Gay Kinkade at 520/428-3807. -- Betty Clemens

Desert Foothills Chapter
Have a treat:  The season's programs will end with a treat  probably lots
of them -- as the Desert Foothills Chapter hosts a dessert potluck buffet
on Wednesday, May 14.  Everyone is urged to bring a plate of their favorite
dessert, cookie, or snack and we will share them after listening to Dr.
Christy  Turner's program.  Coffee and punch will be provided by the
refreshments chair, Audrey Stephens. The meeting will start at 7:30 pm.
Dr. Turner, of Arizona State University, will present a program on
"Cannibalism and Violence in the Southwest."  This will be our last meeting
until September.  Please come! 

Summer Projects:  Joan Clark has been instrumental in getting two artifacts
collections from private property donated to local museums.  The
collections and their repositories are: Blue Wash Site (prehistoric) /
Pueblo Grande Museum; Ocotillo Road Site (historic) / Cave Creek Museum.
Members of Desert Foothills and other chapters excavated this material.
Judith Bell, former owner of the Ocotillo Road Site in Cave Creek, recently
donated her artifacts to the Cave Creek Museum, where they will fit
perfectly with the local historical collection.  We are grateful to Mark
Hackbarth for analyzing this collection.

In an earlier Petroglyph article, we related how Frank Casanova, owner of
the Blue Wash Site in Tonto Hills, agreed to donate his large collection to
Pueblo Grande Museum, which has wanted to fill out their Central Arizona
materials.  Frank packed everything and recently took a truckload to the
Museum  on East Washington Street.

Volunteers are needed to process these items.  Processing means cleaning
(where necessary), sorting, cataloguing, labeling, and packing.  If you are
interested in a cool indoor project for the summer, call our lab director,
Claire Steigerwald at 602/488-9553.

Coming Attractions:  Dr. David Wilcox, Museum of Northern Arizona, will
start the fall season as our speaker on Wednesday, September 10.  We will
have more about the fall programs in the June Petroglyph.  For more
information, contact Grace Schoonover at 602/488-3981. -- Nancy Zeno

Havasu Chapter
For information, please contact Mike Riddle at 520/855-6836.

Homolovi Chapter
WINSLOW -- For information, please contact Karen Berggren at 520/289-4106.

Kaiva Plateau Chapter
FREDONIA -- For information, please contact Wayne Grosz at 801/644-5979.

Lost Dutchman Chapter
APACHE JUNCTION-- For information, please contact Kathleen Krider at 602/
926-6690.

Mohave Chapter
KINGMAN -- For information, please contact John Ainlay at 520/753 2600.
 
Northern Arizona Chapter
The May 20 meeting will feature Charles Hoffman and Christine Stephenson,
who will speak on "Rock Art Along the Upper Little Colorado."  For more
information, please contact Dick Houser at 520/774-4610 or Peggy Taylor at
520/ 526-8963.

Phoenix Chapter
At our April meeting, Dr. John Hohmann spoke to us about "20 Years of
Partnership: AAS and Southwest Research."  The lecture was enjoyed by all
and gave many of us a chance to reminisce about past projects we have
worked on. The speaker for our May meeting will be Joe Ezzo and his topic,
"Good, Bad and Bogus Science in Current Archaeology" should prove
interesting for all who attend.

A Prehistory of the Southwest class will be offered this fall, beginning in
late September.  The instructor will be Maurice Shoger and classes will
meet at his home near 43rd Avenue and Orangewood, just a few minutes west
of the I-17 freeway.  Also in the fall, a ceramics identification class
will be offered if there is enough interest.  Look for details in the June
and September issues of  The Petroglyph.  A minimum of 15 people is
necessary to have the class.  For more information, please call Vicki
Erhart at 602/821-9523. -- Pat Lawson

Salado Chapter
GLOBE/ROOSEVELT -- The  Gila Pueblo and Roosevelt Chapters have combined
memberships, forming the Salado Chapter.  For more information, contact
Bill Mercer at 520/467-2484.

Santa Cruz Valley Chapter
TUCSON TO NOGALES -- The SCVC monthly meeting was held April 11 with
approximately 40 members and guests attending.  The speaker was James
Walker of  the Nature Conservancy.  His slide presentation on the southern
Sinagua, which emphasized the Tuzigoot Phase, was excellent, informative
and interesting!  The chapter will look forward to hearing him speak again
in the future.

The May 13 meeting will be in Madera Canyon.  This will be a social
beginning at 3:00 pm, with dinner at 5:00 pm.  There will be a speaker and
short hikes for those who would like to see the area.  Don't forget to
bring a side dish, tableware and drinks for your group.  This will be the
last meeting until September.

The Hattie Cosgrove trip is still being planned for September.  Those who
have expressed interest will be contacted by telephone or mail with further
information.  For a written reply, please send a self-addressed, stamped
envelope to Nancy Hough, 2660 W Ajo Way, Tucson AZ  85746-9701.

See you in September!  For more information about upcoming meetings and
activities, call Nancy Hough at 520/578-9053. -- Nancy Hough

Shoofly Chapter
PAYSON -- April was a rather quiet month, at least compared to March!
Thursday, April 3, was scheduled to be our chapter meeting, but it was
snowing a baby blizzard and our intended speaker, Heather Tamietti, could
not get down from Heber.  Instead of a program/speaker, we watched one of
our own sets of  slides from Chaco Canyon.  Heather promised us she will
come down and give her presentation "Prehistoric Use of the Mogollon Rim"
at our June meeting.  This meeting will begin at 6:30 pm, on Thursday, June
5, at the Museum.  We will have a "Membership Social" (with refreshments)
preceding the program.  Bring a friend 
... or two.  

At 7:00 pm, on Thursday, May 1, we will have our monthly chapter meeting.
 
The speaker will be Ben Mixon, a member of the Southwest Archaeology Team
and the AAS Agave House Chapter, and his topic will be "Prehistoric
Astronomy."  WOW!!

On Saturday, May 10, there will be a field trip to a Salado platform mound
in the Roosevelt Lake area.  We either will go to Cline Mesa or Schoolhouse
Point, depending how on high Tonto Creek is running.  We will meet at
Subway at 8:00 am and plan to be back in Payson by 2:00 pm. Be sure to
bring water, a sack lunch and wear boots (the snakes are out) and a hat (so
is the sun).  

Saturday, May 17, we are treating ourselves to a STEAK POTLUCK PICNIC!
This will be held at the large group area at Woods Canyon Lake.  The time
and other  details will be announced at the May 1 chapter meeting.  This
should be MUCH fun -- fishing, hiking (lots of great trails) or just
relaxing in the sun.  For more information, please call Sally Mystrom at
520/476-4385 or Audrey Cole at 520/ 474-6773. -- Sally Mystrom

Verde Valley Chapter
It was a "full house" when the Verde Valley Archaeological Society  met on
March 27.  We welcomed several new members and visitors.  After routine
business was conducted, plans for the April field trip to Perry Mesa, and
extended trip to Dinetah in May were discussed.  Marge Herkenham
distributed a fact sheet she had prepared on the Largo-Govenador Canyon
area which is the May field trip destination.

The chapter's thanks and good wishes also were offered to Marietta 
Davenport, who has served as one of our advisors, as she moves on to the 
exciting challenges of her new assignment on the Escalante-Grand Staircase 
district.  Marietta spearheaded many of the rock art recording projects in
the Sedona/Verde Valley area, in which the VVAS members participated.
    
Vice President and Program Chair Sharon Olsen then introduced the evening's 
speaker, Don Keller, archaeologist and research associate at the Museum of 
Northern Arizona.  He began his presentation with an explanation of the 
surveying and mapping techniques used on the recent Hatalacva site recording 
which was completed with a volunteer crew from VVAS.  Keller showed the
various stages involved in the preparation and implementation of the site
mapping process.  The Hatalacva site, above the Verde River, near Tuzigoot,
may have as many as 70 rooms on terraced levels.  It was purchased in 1996
from Phelps Dodge Corporation by the Archaeological Conservancy with
assistance from the Heritage Fund.

Keller then continued with his scheduled topic for the event, exploring
the canyons of the San Juan River arm adjacent to Lake Powell.  Keller
participated in the Four Corners School outdoor experience programs, on the
east side of the lake near Navajo Mountain.  His slides of the many rock
art sites studied and recorded gave sad reminder of all that was lost in
the creation of the dam. His focus was on the contrasts between the
Basketmaker and Pueblo II and III sites, the differences in the rock art
elements, and the association of the sites with the occupation and usage.
Springs near several sites indicate possible agricultural use, with
evidence of irrigation canals, although soil deposits were sparse in the
geological make-up of the region.  Interpretation of the rock art symbols,
including trapezoidal anthropomorphic figures, lobed circular elements,
waterfowl, sheep and "lizard-men" figures, led to lively speculative
discussion. Keller offered that the sites were occupied by ancestral Hopi
approximately 2,500 years ago, and intermittently through the Basketmaker
and Pueblo II and III stages, and more recently as a hide-out for the
Navajo during Kit Carson's roundup in the 1860s.

Scheduled for our May 22 meeting, Dr. David Wilcox, senior research 
archaeologist for the Museum of Northern Arizona and VVAS advisor, will
speak on "The Architecture of Casas Grandes and its Social Implications."
This will be our final meeting before summer recess, and plans for the
MNA/VVAS dig and other summer events will be announced.

Guests are always welcome at our monthly meetings, held at the Church of 
Christ, West Highway 89A in Sedona at 7:30 pm on the fourth Thursday of each 
month, September through May.  Activities continue year round.  For
information about our chapter, you may contact Marlene Conklin at
520/282-0794 or Jerry Robertson at 520/282-5696. -- Marlene Conklin

Yavapai Chapter
PRESCOTT -- This has been a relatively quiet month for the chapter.  In 
March our field trip took us to Partridge Creek, southwest of Ash Fork,
where we explored a quarter mile canyon with some of the oldest petroglyphs
I have ever seen.  Some were so covered with patination that only from the
right angle could the glyph be observed.  Having just finished work at the
Cooley site in Dewey, I was glad I was not recording here!  To me, the most
intriguing of the glyphs were the zoomorphs which were either drawn around
small indentations in the rocks, utilizing the holes as eyes, or else the
small "eye socket" holes had been deliberately added later.  Atop the
canyon was a small ruined structure, perhaps two rooms, one of which had
been so recently potted that the indentations from the screen were still
visible in the pile of dirt.  A single large footprint led away from the
room.  Across the canyon our most common find was Apache tears.

The Neural site report will go to press as soon as the Grossmans return
from vacation in mid-May.  Copies will be sold for $10, prepaid.  Orders
may be placed at the state meeting in Fredonia, by calling Mary Moore at
520/717-2093 or mailing the order to Yavapai Chapter AAS, PO Box 1198,
Prescott AZ  86302.

Meanwhile, we are preparing for our annual appearance at the Folk Art
Fair at Sharlot Hall Museum on June 7 and 8.  As in Archaeology Awareness
Month, we will host an open house and demonstrate pottery making and
repair.  For more information about upcoming activities and chapter
meetings, please contact Mary Moore at 520/717-2093. -- Mary I.S. Moore
_______________

Sedona Area Fee Demonstration Projects
The Sedona/Beaver Creek District of the Coconino National Forest will
implement Fee Demonstration Projects at three popular archaeological sites
on May 1.  A $5 per day entry fee will be charged to visit Palatki (Red
Canyon) and Honanki (one or both sites) to the west of Sedona.  The fee at
the V Bar V Ranch rock art site near the Beaver Creek Campground south of
I-17 will be $3 per day.  Special guided tours of the V Bar V will be
offered for $80 per day for groups.  Full implementation at Honanki will
follow about September.

Golden Eagle and Golden Age Passes will be honored.  Annual passes for
these sites will be sold for $30 per person for 12 visits per year ($60 per
family).  Children 16 and under are free with a paid adult.

The Fee Demonstration Project allows for a minimum of 80% of the revenues 
collected at certain sites subject to high impacts from heavy visitation to
be retained and used at the sites.  Previously, all revenues went to
Washington and the units had to request and justify operating funds
separately.  This project is designed to test management strategies for
heritage sites, all of which will be funded by the fees collected.
Revenues will be used for site protection, monitoring, documentation,
stabilization and needed infrastructure development and interpretation at
these sites, initially, and may be expanded to other sites later.

These sites are well known and visited often by AAS members on chapter
field trips.  These avocational archaeologists are very much aware of the
problems of maintaining these sites and, while possibly regretting the
imposition of fees, should appreciate the necessity of such a step if the
sites are to remain accessible for visitation.

If you wish further information, answers may be obtained by calling the 
Sedona District Ranger Station at 520/282-4119. -- John Sturgis
_______________

Children Activities

Archaeology for Kids Ages 9 to 12
Pueblo Grande Museum Saturday, May 17 9:00 am to 12:00 pm

Children will learn about the science of archaeology and the Hohokam people 
during this hands-on workshop.  The cost is $10 for non-members and $8 for 
members.  For more information, call the Museum at 602/495-0901.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Mesa Southwest Museum Summer Camp for Children Entering Grades 3 through 6
June 2 through June 6
June 9 through 13

The Mesa Southwest Museum will offer a summer camp, Monday through Friday,
June 2 through June 13.  The camp is designed for children entering grades 3
through 6 and will offer activities in history, science, geography, and
Native Americans through fun crafts, stories, behind the scenes museum
tours, games and more!

Participants can register for full-days for one or two weeks, or  can
choose to registrer for half-day sessions on paleontology, archaeology, or
an overview of the Museum's collections.  Lunchtime activities will be
offered for children who attend full-day camp.  

The cost is $65 per week for half-day (either morning or afternoon) or
$110 per week for full-day (both morning and afternoon).  For members of the
Museum, SWAT, SPS or the Guild, the cost is $55 per week for half day or
$90 per week for full-day.

The cost for enrollment in BOTH full-day sessions is discounted to $200 
for non-members and $160 for members.  In addition, there is a $5 per
session discount for enrolling more than one family member.  The Museum is
located at 53 North Macdonald Street in Mesa.  Call 602/644-3071 for more
information or to make reservations.

First Session--June 2 through June 6
8:00 am to 12:00 pm     Archaeology
1:00 pm to 5:00 pm      Paleontology

Second Session--June 9 through June 13
8:00 am to 12:00 pm     Time Travel Through MSWM
1:00 pm to 5:00 pm      Trailblazing Through MSWM   
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1997 Museum of Northern Arizona Discovery Program

MNA offers unique opportunities for children and adults to discover the
natural and cultural heritage of the Colorado Plateau.  Unless otherwise
indicated, activities are held at the Museum of Northern Arizona, 3101
North Fort Valley Road in Flagstaff.  Scholarships for youth programs are
available.  Advance reservations are required and can be made by calling
520/774-5211 ext 220.

Prehistoric Pals (ages 4-5)
June 2 to 6
9:30 am to 12:00 pm

Mary and Dave Duncan lead this journey through the age of dinosaurs and 
discovery through games, songs, crafts, and art activities.  The cost is $55
for members and $60 for nonmembers.

Learning the Lay of the Land (ages 10-15)
June 2 to 7

Join K.C. Hershey in this introduction to orienteering, backcountry camping, 
safety, and the ecology of the San Francisco Peaks region.  The first two
days will be spent exploring the Coconino National Forest and camping near
the van.  Campers will return to Flagstaff for one night before embarking
on a three-day backpacking trip.  The cost is $289 for members and $314 for
non-members.

Duncans' Dinosaurs
June 9 to 13 (ages 6-8)
June 16 to 20 (ages 9-10)
9:00 am to 12:00 pm

Mary and Dave Duncan offer a "dinomite" week of discovering dinosaurs
through fossils, stories, art, and your own creative imagination.  The cost
is $70 for members and $77 for non-members.

Nature Sketchbook (ages 8-13)
June 14
9:00 am to 4:00 pm

Learn with Zack Zdinak how to observe and record artistic records of nature.  
Students will be guided through individual and group exercises using pencil, 
ink, and paint.  The cost is $26 for members and $30 for non-members.

Sheepherder Camp (ages 11-14)
June 20 to 22

Learn with Mary Ann and John Beamer about the historic traditions of 
sheepherding on the San Francisco Peaks.  After an orientation afternoon at
the Museum, campers will set out on foot to explore old trails, carvings,
and camps and to recreate a sheepherder's camp for our overnight stay on
the mountain. The cost is $95 for members and $104 for non-members.

Caves of Flagstaff (ages 11-14)
June 25 to 26

Discover geology from the inside out with Jon Hirsh.  After an orientation
about safety and geology, campers will explore lava tubes, earth cracks and
caverns and camp out under the stars.  The cost is $125 for members and
$137 for nonmembers. 
_______________

Demonstrations

Wire Basket Weaving Demonstration 
The Heard Museum
Saturday, June 7 from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm
Sunday, June 8 from 12:00 pm to 4:00 pm

John Reno (Tohono O'odham) uses wire to make intricate baskets similar to
those made with natural materials by other Tohono O'odham artists.
Visitors can see the techniques Reno uses as well as purchase these unique
baskets.  The cost is $6; $5 for seniors; $3 for children ages 4 to 12; and
free for children under 4 and Museum members.  For more information,
contact the Museum at 602/252-8840.  
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Painting Demonstration
The Heard Museum
Saturday, June 28 from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm
Sunday, June 29 from 12:00 pm to 4:00 pm

Ron Jackson (Navajo) is known for his drawings and watercolor paintings. 
Raised in Window Rock, Arizona, he has received numerous awards for his
work, including honorable mention at the Indian Fair and Market in 1995.
The cost is $6; $5 for seniors; $3 for children ages 4 to 12; and free for
children under 4 and Museum members.  For more information, contact the
Museum at 602/252-8840.  
_______________

Field Trips

Hochderffer Fire Hike
Museum of Northern Arizona
May 10

Join biologist Zack Zdinak on a moderate hike in and around last summer's
big burn to learn firsthand how the trees, grass, shrubs, and soil have
responded to the fire and a winter's rest.  The cost is $35 for members and
$39 for nonmembers.  For more information, contact the Museum at
520/774-5211 ext 220.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Native Plant Walks
Museum of Northern Arizona
Pinyon-Juniper Communities
June 29

Join botanist Ana Goodman in learning about native plants and some of their 
traditional uses while taking a leisurely afternoon walk in the mountains, 
meadows, forest, and canyons surrounding Flagstaff.  The walk begins at
12:30 pm and ends at 5:00 pm.  The cost is $26 for members and $29 for
nonmembers. For more information, contact the Museum at 520/774-5211 ext 220.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Gila Cliff Dwellings and Hattie Cosgrove Country
September 24 to 26
Sponsored by the Santa Cruz Valley Chapter

All AAS members are invited to join us on a field trip to the Silver City,
New Mexico area, also referred to as "Hattie Cosgrove Country."  We are
planning to visit the Gila Cliff Dwellings and a museum which houses some
of the Hattie Cosgrove artifacts.  Some of these areas are not usually open
to the public.

We need at least 15 people to sign up in advance to make the trip 
worthwhile.  You will be responsible for your own food, entry fees, lodging
and transportation.  We will check into available campgrounds and motels,
and also into what the cost would be for a tour bus.  For more information,
contact Jeanne Neal, 1274 N Via Alamos, Green Valley AZ  85614-4010 or
Nancy Hough, 2660 W Ajo Way, Tucson AZ  85746-9701.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Grand Canyon Field Institute

The Grand Canyon Field Institute is dedicated to enhancing the understanding
and enjoyment of the Grand Canyon through firsthand experience.  Classes
are led by knowledgeable, enthusiastic instructors who make exploring the
natural and cultural history of the Canyon region an enjoyable learning
experience.

Ancient Calendars:
The Archaeoastronomy 
of the Colorado Plateau
June 13 to 15

Early Pueblo Indians developed an amazingly accurate calendar system based
upon the movement of the sun, moon and stars.  This class will visit sites
where constructions and inscriptions may have been used to track the
seasons and determine times for ceremonies and planting crops, and to
predict rain.  You will learn how the tracks of the sun, moon and stars
change with the seasons.
 
Class will meet at the campground at Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument 
north of Flagstaff on the afternoon of the initial day.  A van will take 
participants to study sites.  Food, water and kitchen supplies will be
provided.  The cost is $295 (includes, van transportation and meals).  For
more information, call the Institute at 520/638-2485 or visit the web page
at www.thecanyon.com/fieldinstitute
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

The Archaeology Conservancy Yampa River Trip
June 21 to 28

Visit Serviceberry Shelter, Mantle Cave, Deluge Shelter and petroglyphs near 
Whispering Cave.  David Grant Noble, noted author of Ancient Ruins of the 
Southwest and student of Southwestern prehistory will accompany the trip and 
give talks about the areas that are visited.  The cost is $1,495 per person.  
For more information, contact the Conservancy at 520/266-1540.
_______________

Hands-On Activities

Focus on Mayan Life:  Hands-on Activities
The Heard Museum
Saturday, June 14
10:00 am to 4:00 pm

Visitors can enjoy a variety of hands-on activities that center around the 
exhibit "Mayan Life:  Source and Symbol."  Make tassels of yarn and paper
bag pinatas.  There also will be gallery talks in both English and Spanish.
 The entire family will enjoy these special learning activities.  The cost
is $6; $5 for seniors; $3 for children ages 4 to 12; and free for children
under 4 and members of the Museum.  For more information, contact the
Museum at 602/252-8840.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Grand Canyon Field Institute

The Grand Canyon Field Institute is dedicated to enhancing the understanding
and enjoyment of the Grand Canyon through firsthand experience.  Classes
are led by knowledgeable, enthusiastic instructors who make exploring the
natural and cultural history of the Canyon region an enjoyable learning
experience.

Hands-On Archaeology:  
A Five Day North Rim Survey
June 16 to 20

In this class you will learn archaeological survey methods and put them to
use helping park archaeologists study unsurveyed areas of the park.  The
majority of sites are located in the forested areas along the canyon's
rims.  The group will camp near Cape Final on the North Rim's Walhalla
Plateau, an area with some of the highest densities of prehistoric
occupation in the Grand Canyon National Park.  A portion of the proceeds
from this class go to the Grand Canyon Archaeological Fund.  The cost is
$225 (includes meals).  For more information, call the Institute at
520/638-2485 or visit the web page at www.thecanyon.com/fieldinstitute
_______________

Music and Dance Performances

Intertribal Traditional Bird Singers and Dancers
The Heard Museum
Saturday, June 21

Featuring a presentation of songs and dances traditional to the Colorado
River people.  The cost is $6; $5 for seniors; $3 for children ages 4 to
12; and free for children under 4 and members of the Museum.  For more
information, contact the Museum at 602/252-8840.
_______________

Workshops

Stabilization Workshop
at Pueblo Grande Museum
Saturday, May 17
8:00 am to 12:00 pm

Join Pueblo Grande Museum and the Phoenix Chapter for a workshop that will
give participants an opportunity to learn adobe ruin stabilization and help
in preserving the Pueblo Grande ruin for future generations.  The cost is
FREE.  Call Jim Britton at 602/827-8070 or Cherrylee Williams at
602/992-1113 for more information.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Ancient Civilizations of South America Workshop
May 12 to 16
9:00 am to 12:00 pm, 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm

Taught by Professors George Gumerman and Brian Billman.
Description:  This week-long, intensive workshop examines the art and 
archaeology of the prehistoric societies of South America.  The economic, 
religious, aesthetic, and intellectual achievements of the South American 
societies are discussed-from the tool kits of the first hunter-gatherers to
the elaborate temples of the empire states to the arrival of the Spanish
conquerors. By exploring the archaeological clues, we will trace the
evolution of technology, religion, and economy in some of the most
fascinating cultures of the world.

The workshop presents a non-credit opportunity to learn the culture history 
of prehistoric South American civilizations.  You also will have the chance
to participate in the creation of a research design for an ongoing
archaeological excavation in the Moche Valley of Peru.

Requirements:  We suggest that you read The Incas and their Ancestors by 
Michael Moseley prior to the workshop and also research a time period or 
specific culture in which you are interested.  You will lead a discussion on 
your area of interest during the workshop.  We also require that you come
with an open and imaginative mind and that you have a good time!

Contact:  Dr. George Gumerman IV, Department of Anthropology, Northern 
Arizona University, Box 15200, Flagstaff AZ  86011.  Email: 
george.gumerman@nau.edu.  Feel free to call 520/523-3498 for any additional 
information.
_______________

Current Exhibits

Heard Museum
The Cutting Edge:  Contemporary Southwestern Jewelry and Metalwork

The emphasis of this exhibit, which runs through March 1998, is contemporary 
Southwestern jewelry that is innovative in materials, design and/or
techniques.  Featured are works by 37 of the Southwest's most talented
Native American jewelers and silversmiths, each with his or her own unique
and unrivaled style.  

Also included in this exhibit are pieces by master artists such as famed
Hopi jeweler Charles Loloma and Kenneth Begay (Navajo).  For more
information, contact the Museum at 602/252-8840.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Museum of Northern Arizona
Capturing the Spirit:  The Adlerblum Collection 
of Native American Art

This exhibit, which runs through September 7, features 30 drawings and
paintings by Native American children, 85 paintings and prints by Native
American adult artists, and some ethnographic pieces such as pottery and
basketry.  The paintings date from 1920 to 1960, essentially documenting
the development of Native American painting inthe Southwest.  For more
information, contact the Museum at 520/774-5213.
_______________

Sedona Area Fee Demonstration Projects
The Sedona/Beaver Creek District of the Coconino National Forest will
implement Fee Demonstration Projects at three popular archaeological sites
on May 1.  A $5 per day entry fee will be charged to visit Palatki (Red
Canyon) and Honanki (one or both sites) to the west of Sedona.  The fee at
the V Bar V Ranch rock art site near the Beaver Creek Campground south of
I-17 will be $3 per day.  Special guided tours of the V Bar V will be
offered for $80 per day for groups.  Full implementation at Honanki will
follow about September. Golden Eagle and Golden Age Passes will be honored.
 Annual passes for these sites will be sold for $30 per person for 12
visits per year ($60 per family). Children 16 and under are free with a
paid adult.

The Fee Demonstration Project allows for a minimum of 80% of the revenues 
collected at certain sites subject to high impacts from heavy visitation to
be retained and used at the sites.  Previously, all revenues went to
Washington and the units had to request and justify operating funds
separately.  This project is designed to test management strategies for
heritage sites, all of which will be funded by the fees collected.
Revenues will be used for site protection, monitoring, documentation,
stabilization and needed infrastructure development and interpretation at
these sites, initially, and may be expanded to other sites later.

These sites are well known and visited often by AAS members on chapter
field trips.  These avocational archaeologists are very much aware of the
problems of maintaining these sites and, while possibly regretting the
imposition of fees, should appreciate the necessity of such a step if the
sites are to remain accessible for visitation.

If you wish further information, answers may be obtained by calling the 
Sedona District Ranger Station at 520/282-4119. -- John Sturgis
_______________

Spring Symposium Recap.  The 1997 Spring Symposium had a total attendance of 
149, with 25 attending all three nights.  This event was co-sponsored by the 
Southwest Archaeology Team (SWAT) and the Mesa Southwest Museum.

The speakers were outstanding and very well received, leaving the audience 
wanting more.  Jerry Howard delivered a great talk on Archaeology and Pseudo 
Science, Keith Foster showed wonderful slides of early Phoenix and Mesa, and
the speaker from the Humanities Council was a last minute substitute, due
to Dr. Polzer (the scheduled speaker) taking ill.  Dr. Tom Sheridan, from the
Arizona State Museum, did an excellent job of telling us about Missions and
Father Kino. His presentation inspired several people who now plan to tour
these missions.
 
All SWAT and AAS members who did not make the Spring Symposium missed
three great evenings.  We hope you plan to join us in September when we will
present the Fall Symposium. -- Sylvia Lesko and Deb Canright
_______________

Many Thanks!  This year's Archaeology Expo, which was held at Casa Grande
Ruins National Monument, was an outstanding success.  We would like to
thank all of the volunteers from the Southwest Archaeology Team (SWAT) and
other groups who each gave that extra measure in order to make the tours of
the Back Country and the Big House enjoyable for all! -- Deb Canright and
Sylvia Lesko
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

A BIG THANKS TO Bernie Green and Kenneth Stock of the Santa Cruz Valley
Chapter for helping out at the Arizona State Museum's Open House on March
29.  We had a table stocked with recent copies of The Arizona Archaeologist
(thanks to Grace Schoonover getting them to Tucson in time) and AAS
membership information.  It is estimated that about 1,100 people visited
the Open House this year, and hopefully we broadened a few of their
horizons! -- Alan Ferg
_______________

NOTES FROM THE RECORDER'S OFFICE . . . by Les Chapman

During the winter months, I got a few calls about the word "prerequisite" 
associated with the first course in the Certification curriculum, Prehistory
of the Southwest.  Now, I've always considered the word an absolute, sort of
like "pregnant," in that the condition cannot be partially so.

However, on looking into our database, I found that a very large percentage 
of Certification Candidates have been accorded "Certified" status in other 
courses, without having been certified in Prehistory of the Southwest, the 
"basic prerequisite" according to our Certification Program Information
packet.

As you would suspect, this was the subject of spirited discussion at our 
February meeting.  I think Gary Stumpf, chair of the Review Committee, said
it best when suggesting that the course be "a prerequisite for Advanced
Southwest Archaeology courses, and a recommended prerequisite for all the
others."  Gary points out that the wording on pages 2 and 3 of the
Certification Manual considerably "softens the requirement statements" in
other parts of the Manual.

* * * * *
Speaking of Prehistory of the Southwest, Linda Cordell has a new book that
has been approved as an alternative to her original text for that course.
The title is Ancient Pueblo Peoples, Smithsonian, 1994, ISDN 0 89599-038-5.
 For inquiry, call 800/863-9943. Reviewers believe that this book is much
more readable and more suitable for an introductory course.  Since Cordell
does not cover the Hohokam in her new text, David Grant Noble's 1991
effort, The Hohokam, recommended ancillary reading (see course bibliography).


[ SASIG Ed. Note :  Boy, That's a lot of neat archaeology offered for
public participation!  To become a member of the the Arizona Archaeological
Society, visit http://www.swanet.org/azas.html