Message #16:
From: AzTeC SW Archaeology SIG
To:   "'Matthias Giessler'" 
Subject: Entrepeneurial Archaeology-Fake Treasure & Shards, Underwater E-mail, and Technology
Date: Sat, 04 Jan 1997 22:04:48 -0700
Encoding: MIME-Version: 1.0


Working Under Pressure  -- The director of an underwater hotel explains
how guests are using technology as they learn advanced diving
techniques.  Lance Rennka: wired deep-sea hotelier --  As director of
the Scott Carpenter Man in the Sea (MITS) diving program, I run the only
two operational underwater habitats in the world. One is the Jules'
Undersea Lodge (the world's only under-water hotel), and the other is
MarineLab Undersea Laboratory, an underwater research facility. Both are
situated about 22 feet underwater in a lagoon in Key Largo, Fla. Each
year more than 500 people come through the program--recreational divers
to university researchers--to learn advanced diving techniques as they
apply to marine archaeology and marine biology. We even have a mock-up
of a 16th-century Spanish galleon,  complete with pottery shards and
fake treasure, to help train budding marine archaeologists.  Diving,
like everything else, has gone high tech. Some of our divers wear
computers strapped to their wrists that monitor time, depth, and blood
gases. In the future they'll have information displayed in their 
masks.  To get into the habitats, we swim down and enter from underneath
into an air pocket. All clothing and electrical equipment, including
laptops and underwater cameras, are wrapped in plastic and then
transported down in airtight  suitcases.  I now have more  than $5
million worth of toys in the habitats, including communications
technology. I can communicate using a wireless sound-powered  phone, a
land-line phone, an intercom, an open microphone, and E-mail from my
laptops. During an underwater experiment I can hold a teleconference or
a videoconference with folks at a university or at our funding source,
the Marine Resources Development Foundation (MRDF). Most often, our
videoconferencing equipment is used for long-distance learning. In May
1995, for example, a group of high school students came for a weeklong
program. At the end of the week, the students took part in a "sealink,"
a live satellite link, to the Seattle Aquarium.  I've been scuba diving
since 1957 and have worked as an oceanographic technician, a commercial
diver, and a teacher. I still conduct research as well as write books on
scuba diving. Having my laptops in the habitats gives me the flexibility
to write at the scene of underwater activity. I also like working in the
habitats because they are oxygen-enriched environments; I think better
there.  When I'm underwater I can also take care of the day-to-day
business of running the MITS program. With E-mail I'm  always in touch
with others at MRDF and with potential clients. If I'm in a habitat when
someone E-mails me, I can respond and even  get started on the
paperwork.  As for the hotel, it's a blast. It attracts a tremendous
variety of people. We've had Belgian couples and German couples. We've
had weddings and honeymoons. We've even had the Snorkeling
Elvises--three Japanese men who looked like Elvis and played the King's
music all night. If I had all the money in the world, I'd still be doing
this job.  Lance Rennka can be reached at .

From: http://www.inc.com/incmagazine/archives/18961401.html


After raising money from outside investors, lots of companies are so
guarded about their businesses, it's no wonder their investors begin
to lose interest. That doesn't seem to be much of an issue for
Tampa-based Seahawk Deep Ocean Technology, which has done four
financings since 1988.  Granted, Seahawk's business (recovering
shipwrecks and sunken treasures, using robots and remote-controlled
vehicles) is a bit more captivating than most. Even so, the company goes
to extraordinary lengths to keep public shareholders and limited
partners informed. Here  are the main ingredients of its
investor-relations program:  Newsletters. Four to six times a year
Seahawk sends out a  four-page newsletter providing information on the
company's activities. Notably absent from the content is news about
earnings (which have yet to materialize for the less-than- $1-million
company); financial information is disseminated separately. "Investors
want to know what we're doing and what we're thinking about," says
cofounder Greg Stemm.  Videotapes. Seahawk started distributing
collected video clips of coverage from TV. It recently produced its own
informational video, which it sells to investors at cost, $4.95.  Tours
and open houses. In its offices, the company maintains exhibits that
feature artifacts Seahawk vessels have recovered. Investors are
encouraged to visit, and they can arrange to go on board when the ships
are in port.  Weekly phone updates. Every week the company does a
recorded bulletin. By calling a special phone number, investors can hear
updates on search locations, weather impact, and so on.  Fax line. For
the past year Seahawk has made a wide range of company  information --
everything from press releases to 10-K reports -- available by fax.
Investors can request a directory of available items by  entering their
fax number into a touch-tone phone; specific documents can be ordered by
touch tone, as well.  Some managers might think Seahawk's communication
goes too far, but Stemm thinks the company comes out leagues ahead. "For
one thing, our  shareholders are extremely loyal," he says, which
certainly doesn't hurt whenever the company needs money. What's more,
some enthusiastic investors have come to work for Seahawk as employees.

From: http://www.inc.com/incmagazine/archives/04921232.html