Message #373:
From: AzTeC SW Archaeology SIG
To:   "'Matthias Giessler'" 
Subject: Casa Grande Ruins National Monument
Date: Tue, 19 Nov 96 09:43:00 MST
Encoding: 61 TEXT


From: Mark Henderson
To: preservation-l@netcom.com 
Cc: Brian Kenny, Lisa Pfost
Subject: RE: Casa Grande Ruins National Monument
Date: Mon, 18 Nov 1996 21:08:00 -0800

Scott- You might want to check out the Southwest Archaeology webpage at: 
http://www.swanet.org/ for Casa Grande experts.  I have taken 
the liberty of copying your original message to Brian Kenny, the SW 
Archaeology Page administrator.  He may post your inquiry to that list.  You 
might in addition want to contact southwestern adobe preservation 
specialists if you have not already.  I would suggest Michael Taylor with 
New Mexico State Monuments Division in Santa Fe as a person to contact.  I 
might be able to track down an e-mail address if you have trouble finding 
him.  He has contact with adobe stabilization folks everywhere (ICOMOS).  I 
have also taken the liberty of copying Lisa Pfost who is a structural 
stabilization archeologist who has worked extensively with documentation and 
stabilization at Walnut Canyon National Monument near Flagstaff.  Lisa could 
help you contact others in the AZ ruins stabilization circle and some of the 
archeologists that have worked on other topical materials besides 
stabilization at Casa Grande (Dave Wilcox at the Museum of Northern Arizona 
comes to mind).  I would be personally interested in knowing more about your 
project.  I am particularly interested in your methods of documentation and 
any evidence you find in your survey of features that may have calendric 
significance.  This may be relevant to a mud walled building in a "Fremont" 
community near Great Basin National Park. The large (that means about 7 m on 
a side) square central building is inferred to have had an orientation 
related to an "horizon calendar" which may have also been the function of 
the Casa Grande.  The surrounding pithouses and smaller adobe buildings 
remind me of a small scale Casa Grande (those Southwesternists should get a 
chuckle from the comparison).  Stay in touch.
Mark Henderson mhenderson@idsely.com;  702-289-1884 (daytime)


>From:     Scott W. Carpenter
>Subject:  Casa Grande Ruins National Monument
>To:       Archaeology and Historic Preservation Colleagues
>I am a registered architect and a graduate student attending the 
>architectural Conservation Program at the University of Pennsylvania.  I've 
>been a long-time subscriber to this newsletter, but this is the first time 
>I've actually worked up the nerve to submit a post.  During the upcoming 
>1996-97 Winter Break, seven or eight of my fellow students and I will be 
>preparing a conditions survey report of the Hohokam Big House of Casa Grande 
>Ruins National Monument in Arizona.  The survey will be directed by Frank 
>Matero, Director of the Historic Preservation Program at Penn, in 
>conjunction with members of the National Parks Service. Casa Grande was the 
>first prehistoric reserve to be established in the United States  (1892), 
>and one of the earliest conservation projects conducted by the U.S. 
>government. Phase I of this work will include two MS theses (Del Bono and 
>Fong) and the documentation of the past and existing conditions of the 
>earthen construction and plaster finishes.  I am currently reading through 
>the conservation / administrative history of the site written by A. Berle 
>Clemensen.  However, I was curious as to whether  any of the subscribers to 
>this newsletter have first-hand experience with this site, or sites in its 
>general vicinity.  Any insight you might provide into this unique cultural 
>treasure would be much appreciated.  I may be contacted by e-mail at the 
>following address:  carpents@dolphin.upenn.edu. Thank you for your 
>assistance in advance!