Message #149:
From: AzTeC SW Archaeology SIG
To:   "'Matthias Giessler'" 
Subject: Q & A on SW Archaeology Jobs
Date: Thu, 16 May 96 08:29:00 MST
Encoding: 34 TEXT


Q:  I am a recent graduate in archaeology at Kent State University. I am 
searching for a job in the southwest and wondered if you had any pointers. I 
have plenty of resumes to send out so if you know someone I could send one 
to it would be much appreciated if you helped out.  When my hmepage gets 
done I will also have a resume on-line.  Thanks.  John G Bender E-mail: 
gbender@gwis.com.   
URL: http://w3.gwis.com/~gbender/ / 
     http://phoenix.kent.edu/~anthro

A: Subject: Re: jobs in southwest -- I recommend you go to the SWA E-mail 
list at http://www.swanet.org/email.html.  There you can find 
names and e-mail addresses of Southwestern Archaeologists.  For NM, I 
recommend you ask the advice of David Phillips or Lynne Sebastian.  For AZ, 
look at firms with AZ State Museum permits 
http://www.swanet.org/asm.html.  There are additional links to 
archaeologits on the SWA 'Contact an Archaeologist' page, and throughout the 
SWA web site.  Before you send resumes cold, contact individuals and focus 
on research topics and skill needs. You might ask firms which field or 
analytical skills they most need, which skills are in short supply, then 
target those needs.  Many cold-call resumes get thrown in the trash, so mass 
mailings can be a waste of time.  Most jobs in archaeology come from 
establishing personal relationships and a record of substantive work using 
applied skill sets.  If you get to the Southwest, join as many professional 
and avocational societies as possible, read all their newsletters, and 
attend the meetings.  If you havent done a lot of public speaking, get 
training, learn how to speak persuasively and practice those skills with a 
knockout presentation; archaeology advances with persuasion (oral and 
written).  Write short research pieces for publication and submit them to 
research journals (or places like the SWA web page); written work provides 
name recognition.  My opinion is that many firms could use archaeologists, 
whom in addition to having archaeological field skills, also know HTML and 
statistical analyses, and have some computer programming and configuration 
skills.  These skills get you in the door of the lab; pretty soon youll be 
in the field. Brian Kenny 
http://www.swanet.org/bkenny.html.