Message #65:
From: AzTeC SW Archaeology SIG
To:   "'Matthias Giessler'" 
Subject: Life In The Past Lane (SCA Conference April 1996)
Date: Thu, 22 Feb 96 09:55:00 MST
Encoding: 242 TEXT


Life In The Past Lane
Society for Commercial Archeology (SCA) 1996 Conference
Los Angeles California
April 17-20, 1996

Co-Sponsored by the Los Angeles Conservancy and the Automobile Club of 
Southern California

LOS ANGELES
is frequently described as a capital of car culture.  From its eye-catching 
roadside architecture to the nation's most extensive urban freeway system, 
the region offers much to support that claim.

By itself, however, the car cannot explain the complex evolution of greater 
Los Angeles in the 20th century.  The settlement paftern of dispersed 
centers owes much to the Pacific Electric interurban street-railway system. 
 The L-shaped strip mail and the Googie-style restaurant might have 
originated in Southern California, but drive-ins and other forms of 
car-based commercial architecture began elsewhere.  The auto-mobile suburb 
has also developed in many regions.

Like most aspects of life in Los Angeles, its car-culture reputation 
reflects the influence of the entertainment business.  Movies, TV, music, 
magazines, and theme parks magnified local experience by transmifting it to 
national and worldwide audiences.  The popular-culture industry also helped 
to foster a certain exuberant - some would say tawdry - approach to design 
that is evident in elements of the built environment.

Combining the direct observation of the bus tours and the expert commentary 
of the symposium, this meeting will equip its participants to assess for 
themselves the role of Los Angeles in creating the car-based urban 
environments of the 20th century.

THE SPONSORS:
The Society for Commercial Archeology is the oldest national organization 
devoted to the commercial-built environment The purpose of the SCA is to 
recognize the unique historical significance of that environment and the 
cultural landscapes of America, with an emphasis on the impact that the 
automobile has had on the shaping of our culture.

The Los Angeles Conservancy is a private, non-profit organization with over 
5,000 members.  It is devoted to the recognition, preservation and 
revitalization of the historic built environment of greater Los Angeles. 
The Automobile Club of Southern California, the largest affiliate of the 
American Automobile Association, has been serving members since 1900. 
Today, the Auto Club's 4.2 million members benefit by the organization's 
emergency road service, public safety programs, travel planning, highway and 
transportation safety programs, automotive testing and analysis, 
automobile and homeowners insurance, and legislative advocacy.

SCHEDULE

WEDNESDAY  APRIL 17 1996
Reception
7:00 - 1 0:00 PM              Biltmore Hotel Ballroom

THURSDAY APRIL 18 1996
BUS TOUR: DOWNTOWN AND WEST
Pickup at 8:30 AM and dropoff at 6:00 PM, at the Biltmore. Lunch included. 
Each bus will have two guides to identify and interpret the buildings and 
streetscapes.

Based on the Conservancy's "Cruising Postwar LA!' tour, the route starts in 
downtown, loops into the San Fernando Valley, and meanders through much of 
the West Side.  This tour offers a broad overview of the city while taking 
in many of the region's landmarks of postwar commercial architecture: the 
nation's oldest Bob's Big Boy in Burbank, Pann's Coffee Shop in Westchester, 
Capitol Records in Hollywood, and a 1950s shopping district in Beverly 
Hills.  Besides these and other focal points, the tour will showcase the 
remarkable extent and diversity of commercial LA: motels, florists, gas 
stations, churches, dingbat apartments and more.

The route also includes many other notable elements of the region's built 
environment such as downtown and the civic center, the four-level 
interchange, Central Avenue, Wilshire Boulevard's Miracle Mile, and Gregory 
Ain's 1947 tract houses in Mar Vista.

F R I D A Y APRIL 19 1996
METROPOLITAN LANDSCAPE SYMPOSIUM
BILTMORE BALLROOM

8:45 AM
OPENING REMARKS

9:00 - 10:30 AM
LAND USE AND THE REGIONAL VISION
Chair and comment: William Deverell, California Institute of Technology

Greg Hise, University of Southern California. Suburbanization as 
Urbanization: Industry and Industrial Districts in 1920s Los Angeles

James Williams, DeAnza College. Energy and the Shaping of the Califomia City

Robert Bruegmann, University of Illinois at Chicago.  Exceptional, Typical, 
Prototypical.  Southern Califomia and 20th-Century Urbanism

10:45 AM-12:15 PM
GETTING THERE: RAIL AND ROAD, PARKWAY AND FREEWAY
Chair and comment: Rudi Volti, Pitzer College

Robert Post Dibner Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
 Streetcars, Image and Ideology

Mafthew Roth, Automobile Club of Southern California. Not in My Front Yard. 
 Conflicts Over Road Construction in Los Angeles, 1920-1940

Bruce Seely, Michigan Technological University. Experts in Action: The 
Bureau of Public Roads and Urban Freeways, 1930-1950

SYMPOSIUM  BILTMORE BALLROOM
1:30 - 3:00 PM
SEEN BY THE ROAD: BUILDING CAR CULTURE,  PART 1
Chair and comment: Jeffrey M. Chusid, A.I.A., University of Southern 
California

Alan Hess, architecture critic, San Jose Mercury News. Car City 
Architecture: A Revised List of Monuments

John Chase, architect , The Stucco Box

 Wayne Hunt environmental graphic designer,  A Landscape of Signs

3:15 - 4:45 PM
SEEN BY THE ROAD: BUILDING CAR CULTURE, PART 2
Chair and comment: Thomas Hines, University of California, Los Angeles

Jim Heimann, author and designer. Booze, Bread, M. G.M., Ham and Giant Dogs: 
The Emerging Urban Landscape of Washington
 Boulevard, 1920-1940

Linda Breftler and Richard Destin, architects.  The LA Carwash: Visions of 
the Future (Passed)

Arthur Krim, Survey Systems, Inc. The "Four-Level' Stack as Los Angeles Icon

4:45 PM GENERAL DISCUSSION

SCA ANNUAL MEETING AND "5-MINUTE STORIES"
 7:00 - 8:00 PM           Location to be announced.

FILM FESTIVAL
 8:00 - 1 0:00 PM         Location to be announced.

Starting in the 1920s, the movie studios periodically shot stock footage 
along the streets of Los Angeles. These images appeared in feature films as 
the background in scenes that took place in moving vehicles.  Known as 
'process film," the stock streetscape footage was projected behind cutaway 
vehicles to create the illusion of movement . The evening's program is 
assembled from process film that has rarely been shown to audiences.  It 
depicts the historic appearance of the city with extraordinary detail, scope 
and richness.

SATURDAY APRIL 20 1996
BUSTOUR:  SUBURBAN METROPOLIS
Pickup at 8:30 AM and dropoff at 6:00 PM, at the Biltmore.  Lunch included. 
 Each bus will have two guides to identify and interpret the buildings and 
streetscapes. This tour explores two of the principal regions of post-World 
War 11 development: the San Gabriel   Valley and the 1-5 corridor into 
northern Orange County.  The roads themselves are part of the story, 
including the Arroyo Seco Parkway (now Pasadena Freeway), the original 1-5 
alignment and Route 66.  Highlights will include the Bullock's Pasadena 
  department store (1947); the Covina Bowl, an Egyptian/Aztec Modern bowling 
alley (1955); the Eastland Shopping Center (1957); and the oldest surviving 
McDonald's (1953).


SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17
4:00 PM      Registration desk open, Biltmore Hotel
7:00 - 10:00 PM     Reception, Biltmore Hotel

THURSDAY, APRIL 18
8:30 AM - 6:00 PM      Bus Tour: Downtown and West

FRIDAY, APRIL 19
8:45 AM - 5:30 PM       Symposium, at Biltmore Hotel
7:00 - 8:00 PM            SCA Annual meeting and "5-Minute Stories"
8:00 - 10:00 PM           Film Festival

SATURDAY, APRIL 20
8:30 AM - 6:00 PM     Bus Tour: Suburban Metropolis

DRESS
April in LA brings temperatures between 50 and 75 degrees and a remote 
chance of rain.  Flat, sturdy shoes are recommended for the tours, which 
will include numerous photo stops, some walking, and frequent boarding and 
exiting of buses.

HOTEL
Conference headquarters is the Biltmore Hotel in downtown Los Angeles.  In 
the continental US, the toll-free reservation number is   800-245-8673; from 
elsewhere dial  213-624-1011.  To receive the reduced rate you must make 
your reservations before March 26,1996 and mention the SCA Conference when 
making reservations.  Conference rate is $80.00 per person, single or double 
occupany.

TRAVEL
For airline and rental-car reservations, conference aftendees may call the 
Airline Express Desk of the Automobile Club of Southern   California at 
714-850-2833; ask for Carol or Gloria.  Certain discounts may be available 
for AAA members. Be sure to state that you are aftending the SCA Conference.

GENERAL REGISTRATION
Includes Wednesday reception, Friday symposium, Friday night film festival 
and all conference materials (tour books, maps, paper abstracts)  members* 
$55,  non-members $65

THURSDAY BUS TOUR
members' $60,  non-members $75

SATURDAY BUS TOUR
members* $60,  non-members $75

* Member rates apply to members of Society for Commercial Archeology, 
American Automobile Association, or Los Angeles    Conservancy.

REGISTRATION FORM

Name:

Affiliation:

Address:

Daytime phone:

Print and mail this registration form with payment in full, US funds only, 
checks payable to SCA-Los Angeles Conference, to:

SCA Conference
c/o Los Angeles Conservancy
Roosevelt Building
727 West Seventh Street, Suite 955
Los Angeles, CA 90017

Cancellations after April 1, 1996 will not be entitled to any refund.

CONFERENCE INFORMATION:   213-623-2489