Special Events > Workshops

Friday Afternoon, August 8 (download pdf doc)

Location 1: Rocky Mountain Forest Experiment Station

1. New Methods of Site Survey Recording on National Forests
Administration Building, four successive workshops, 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Limit: 12 persons in each 1-hour workshop

Kaibab National Forest archaeologists Michael Lyndon, Erin Woodard, Margaret Hangan, and Logan Simpson Design archaeologist Michael Novotny will lead 4-one hour sessions that will provide a PowerPoint overview about new requirements for Forest Service heritage data collection and management. After the overview, archaeologists will conduct a brief field demonstration on how they collect archaeological site information with the INFRA Mobile Application and how they capture geospatial data as well. As an increasing number of Forest Service heritage programs are requiring data to be collected in this manner, this workshop will be valuable to both contract archaeologists and archaeologists considering working for National Forests.

2. GPS
Administration Building, 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Jim Holmlund of Western Mapping Company will offer a workshop on the latest advances in 3-D lidar scanning of archaeological sites, features, and artifacts, as well as fundamentals of GPS mapping.

3. Creativity in Challenging Consultations: Beyond Everyday Compliance

Classroom Building, 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Organizer/Presenter: Peter Pilles

Most agency consultations involve recurrent situations where determinations of effect, resolving potential project impacts, and tribal interests have typically become a routine process. However, there are times when unusual and out-of-the ordinary projects pop up that provide opportunities for creative or non-typical approaches to consultation. Several such non-typical projects will be the topics of two separate workshops conducted by J. Scott Wood, Tonto National Forest Archaeologist, and Peter Pilles, Coconino National Forest Archaeologist. They will present actual case examples, explaining the challenging aspects of the project consultation. Participants will be divided into teams to discuss possible approaches to each case. Each team will present its recommendation to the group and the pros, cons, and implications of each will be discussed. Finally, the Forest Archaeologist will explain how each case was actually resolved with an evaluation of how well it did or did not meet the consultation needs of the project.

Location 2: Colton Research Center, Museum of Northern Arizona

4. Identification of Northern Arizona Ceramic Types and New Methods of Ceramic Dating: Black-on-white types
Anthropology Collections, Ceramic Repository (Building 11), 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Organizer/Presenter: Chris Downum

The status of Tusayan White Ware and Little Colorado types and varieties will be reviewed. Sherds representing “consensus” versions of the types (with type designations agreed upon by at least four analysts) will be provided for study. Using these type sherds, we will discuss the list of attributes now used to identify black-on-white types in northern Arizona (3 hours).

A second session (1 hour) will review the method of mean ceramic dating and evaluate its effectiveness. We will also review new thickness-based regression equations now being used to date undecorated Alameda Brown Ware and San Francisco Mountain Gray Ware sherd assemblages. Sherd thickness for plain ware sherds in northern Arizona is now known to increase predictably through time, with calibrations achieved through study of tree-ring dated assemblages. The regression equations, which use simple field-based measures of average sherd thickness, have shown great promise as a method to date sites having few or no decorated sherds. We will discuss the how to use the regression formulas and the field protocols for sherd thickness measurements.

Saturday Afternoon, August 9 (download pdf doc)

Location 2: Colton Research Center, Museum of Northern Arizona

5. Creativity in Challenging Consultations: Beyond Everyday Compliance

Pearson Hall (Building 34), 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Presenter: J. Scott Wood

Most agency consultations involve recurrent situations where determinations of effect, resolving potential project impacts, and tribal interests have typically become a routine process. However, there are times when unusual and out-of-the ordinary projects pop up that provide opportunities for creative or non-typical approaches to consultation. Several such non-typical projects will be the topics of two separate workshops conducted by J. Scott Wood, Tonto National Forest Archaeologist, and Peter Pilles, Coconino National Forest Archaeologist. They will present actual case examples, explaining the challenging aspects of the project consultation. Participants will be divided into teams to discuss possible approaches to each case. Each team will present its recommendation to the group and the pros, cons, and implications of each will be discussed. Finally, the Forest Archaeologist will explain how each case was actually resolved with an evaluation of how well it did or did not meet the consultation needs of the project.

6. Identification of Northern Arizona Ceramic Types and New Methods of Ceramic Dating: Red Ware and Polychrome Types
Anthropology Collections, Ceramic Repository (Building 11), 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Organizer/Presenter: Chris Downum

The status of San Juan Red Ware, Tsegi Orange Ware, Winslow Orange Ware, and Jeddito Yellow Ware types and varieties will be reviewed. Sherds representing “consensus” versions of the types (with type designations agreed upon by at least four analysts) will be provided for study. Using these type sherds, we will discuss the list of attributes now used to identify redware and polychrome types in northern Arizona (3 hours).

A second session (1 hour) will review the method of mean ceramic dating and evaluate its effectiveness. We will also review new thickness-based regression equations now being used to date undecorated Alameda Brown Ware and San Francisco Mountain Gray Ware sherd assemblages. Sherd thickness for plain ware sherds in northern Arizona is now known to increase predictably through time, with calibrations achieved through study of tree-ring dated assemblages. The regression equations, which use simple field-based measures of average sherd thickness, have shown great promise as a method to date sites having few or no decorated sherds. We will discuss the how to use the regression formulas and the field protocols for sherd thickness measurements.