Schedule > August 7 (THU) > Program

2008 Pecos Conference

Program Subject to Change: (download pdf doc)

Preliminary Program: “A Century of Cooperation, Collaboration, and Progress“

Thursday, August 7
Location: MNA Branigar-Chase Discovery Center

Opening Reception

The 2008 Pecos Conference will begin on Thursday, August 7.

The campground will be opened at the Pecos Meeting Site: camping may commence by afternoon.

Pick up your 2008 Pecos Conferencce packet if you pre-registered. Registration packets will be available for distribution at the Museum’s Branigar-Chase Discovery Center from 3:00 pm to 7:30 pm.

A reception will be held at the Museum from 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm, and the whole Museum will be kept open during that time. Enjoy light refreshments and conversation with other conference attendees.

Three special events are planned during the reception:

First, we plan to honor a very special Southwestern archaeologist, David A. Breternitz, by dedicating the 2008 conference to him. If people would like to contribute photographs or stories in this regard, contact Todd Metzger at <todd_metzger@nps.gov>.

Secondly, a silent auction to benefit the Kenny Acord Memorial Award will be held in Branigar Hall, Thursday, August 7, from 5:30 to 7:30 pm in conjunction with the Opening Reception for the 2008 Pecos Conference.

At 7pm, Paul Reed will sign copies of his new edited volume: Chaco's Northern Prodigies: Salmon, Aztec, and the Ascendancy of the Middle San Juan Region after AD 1100, just published by the University of Utah Press. Expanding on re-invigorated Chacoan studies of the last decade, Chaco's Northern Prodigies highlights new research by a diverse group of institutions and individuals over the last decade. Authors explore the dual status of the Salmon and Aztec pueblos, and other communities, as 11th- and 12th-century Chacoan Outliers and central places in the 1200s landscape of the Middle San Juan region. The book's contributors elucidate aspects of Middle San Juan archaeology with previously unexplored methods, and for the first time, highlight the unique, local configuration of ancient Middle San Juan history and culture. (Paul Reed is a Center for Desert Archaeology Preservation Archaeologist, working at Salmon Ruins Museum, New Mexico).